New Book Focuses on How to Handle Business Growth Beyond Sales

In Sales Won’t Save Your Business, “Super” Joe Pardo answers the questions business owners have about how to create a viable and successful business beyond just selling. The book’s title is very apt because, as Joe points out, selling a lot of your product won’t help your business if you don’t have an effective team in place to handle customer service and you don’t have the right processes and procedures in place to prepare for the growth that results from sales. As a result, Joe takes the reader on a journey to the TOP by dividing the book into three parts that focus on Team, Offer, and Process.Following a foreword by Lee Cockerell, Retired Executive Vice President of Walt Disney World┬« Resort, Super Joe jumps right into telling it like it is by asking readers to recall why they started a business in the first place, what is the biggest stress generator in the business, and what they can do to empower themselves in the business.Joe refers to the contents page as a roadmap, and rather than having chapters, he calls each section a “pin” on that roadmap-a place you must stop and master to move forward in your journey to business growth.At the heart of this book is a request for the reader to become self-aware. Joe reminds readers to ask others for feedback about their own strengths and weaknesses, to ask for help, not to work themselves to death, and to focus on the influence they have on others. That influence affects the business owner’s team members and their success, so the first part of the book focuses on how to create a successful team, which is an extension of the business and its owner. As Joe says, “Your business is a tree, and the roots of that tree are made of strong relationships.” Being a business owner also means being a leader, which means you have to dig in and do the work yourself. Joe states, “At times, you will need to fill in because of a worker shortage or an emergency. In such situations, it is important for your team to understand you are not just going to sit back and make them do all of the work. This does not mean, however, that you should be working in your business all of the time versus on your business. A great leader knows how to find the balance that will earn respect.”


Being a leader means inspiring your team, and it also means entrusting that team to do what you would do when you don’t have time to do it. Relinquishing power to others is often difficult for leaders, but Joe points out that when you try to micromanage your team, you take power from your managers; that makes team members second-guess their managers and do what they think you want, even though they may not always know what you want. Therefore, you have to empower your managers by letting go of all the power.Change is always difficult for organizations, so if you want to implement the changes Joe recommends, you’ll have to deal with people who don’t like change.Consequently, Joe spends a lot of time talking about how to incorporate change in your business without ruffling too many feathers. To illustrate his point, he shares his own story of implementing change in his family’s business, and how, despite a few ruffled feathers, the process became successful.Despite whatever changes you make, the ultimate goal is to provide customer satisfaction. In Part 2: Focus on the Offer, Joe talks about how to price products properly and how to get your team aligned with providing customer service. The best advice Joe gives here is how to teach your team to focus on the customer’s perspective when providing service.


In Part 3: Focus on the Process, Joe reminds us it’s vital that business owners always seek ways not just to change but to improve. In order to do that, you have to have clear processes. Once processes are in place, team members are clear on their tasks and then the business can run smoothly. As a result, you won’t need to micromanage; you’ll then have time to work on your business rather than working in it.There’s much more I could talk about here-excellent advice on hiring, firing, and promoting team members; advice on incorporating technology into your business; and advice on how to grow your profit by improving your training. Throughout, Joe sprinkles in his “Super Joe Says” sayings-which are like modern proverbs for business owners. Each pin ends with exercises so that readers don’t just have a reading but a learning experience, allowing them to look at their own businesses and come up with the answers they need. As a result, they’ll close this book having the tools to take their businesses to new levels of growth and their own lives to increased satisfaction.

I’m Not a Sales Person But I Have to Sell – What Do I Do?

After thousands of hours of study and many years honing technical skills to be a competent professional in your chosen field, it can come as a rude shock that you now need to sell your services and capabilities as well. In today’s busy market, a competent selling capability isn’t a nice-to-have it is an essential business and life skill.

Interestingly, the topic of selling and growing a business often doesn’t feature in those university lectures does it? In fact, selling is in many cases covered over and, if spoken about at all, was only mentioned as an unsavoury aspect employed by the desperate. ‘We don’t have to sell because we are…’ are the famous last words of many failed professional or small business owners who focus only on their domain of expertise as the distinguishing factor. Well those days are well and truly over.

This myopic view of the essential life skill of selling has often left people feeling vulnerable, confused and financially worse off. No longer can you rely upon only your technical competence to guarantee your success or wait around for passive referrals.

The bad press that often accompanies the profession of selling doesn’t help either. Often the only ‘selling’ stories we hear or read about in the media are those about shonky operators exploiting anyone they can, especially the vulnerable and weak. For instance, the plethora of insulation businesses and telemarketing firms exposed as fraudulent and incompetent has done nothing for the PR of selling. This type of behaviour is labelled as ‘selling’ by the media which I argue is incorrect. The type of behaviour and intentions exhibited by these operators and other ‘shonk merchants’ is actually fraud and deception, and in some cases bullying and intimidation. That is not selling. This is one reason why many people don’t want to be in sales. Who wants to be associated with ‘shonk’?

There is another issue too, the old Australian legacy of the ‘tall poppy’ syndrome. Heaven forbid that you take proactive control over your destiny by getting out there and promoting your business and your capabilities so others may benefit. Heaven forbid that you actually make a name for yourself. ‘Who do they think they are?’ or ‘They’ve got tickets on themselves’ are some of the catch cries from people who begrudge those who get up and make what they do visible to other the people.

These syncs often confuse proactive, ethical self promotion, prospecting, and selling practices with self- grandiose, boasting or big noting. Sure there are a few people for whom this is true; it’s all about them. While these people can be highly entertaining in some instances, people often tire of them if there is nothing of real value and substance to support them. The truth is one can lead a very successful sales career without becoming a boastful, self-absorbed git. In fact, the research into highly effective sales professionals shows they are often humble, highly self-aware, collaborative, see the big picture and details, effective at what they do, and have a ‘we’ not ‘me’ focus. They are very capable, resourceful, and engender trust on all levels. They are worth knowing. Is this what most of us want for ourselves? Don’t we want people to know that if they work with us they will be better off as a result?

Despite the overexposure of those shonky operators by the media or the cringe factor brought about by the ‘tall poppy’ critics, there are a lot of good untold stories about ethical selling practices out there. They often don’t make the mainstream media or general conversations because they are happening everyday in millions of ways. It’s a bit like IT, we never celebrate or talk about the fact that our IT system hasn’t crashed we only hear and complain about it when something goes wrong.

Yet many people struggling with the concept of selling pay good money to go on selling skills courses to learn how to sell and yet they never put it into practice. So before you pay money for selling skills, examine the state of your mind; the beliefs, feelings, and intentions you hold about selling.

Your beliefs, not your abilities, could be holding you and your career hostage. Before you can dedicate the energy to become skillful and masterful in something as complex as selling, you need to want to sell.

So let’s cut to the chase, for those of you who now need to consciously include the capability of selling in your business mindset and skills here are a few things to consider:

  • Why do you need to sell? Who will benefit from you being able to sell competently?
  • How will ethically and proactively promoting and selling your capabilities help you and your clients?
  • What is your current view of selling? Do you hold onto a view that makes you feel ashamed of selling? How is that view affecting your ability to keep your business healthy and viable?
  • Can you reframe your thinking about selling? See it as a way to make what you do visible to the people who need to know about you so they can benefit from your skills and talent?
  • How do you feel about the statement ‘everybody lives by selling something’?
  • How can selling be incorporated into your business and align with your ethical values and desire to run an honourable business?
  • Do you feel worthy of being able to earn what you are worth?

Sadly limiting beliefs about selling are a significant issue for many people and something that can be overcome with patience, clarity, and persistence. If this is an issue for you please feel free to contact us to discuss this further. We would be happy to help you get started on your sales career.

Remember everybody lives by selling something

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